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compassion, collaboration & cooperation iN transistion

 Previously Posted on Jun 23rd, 2007 by  martha@zaadz   

Today I encountered a comment that Michael made on Julian's blog ... 


and I really liked it as a stand-alone piece. I got a lot out of it and wanted to keep the words in a place more easily accessible to me, so I'm copying them here and want to share them with anyone who hasn't come across them yet. Friends who are interested in shadow work might really like this:

BEING understood as a way to focus the mind enough to go under the defensive omnipotent
fantasies into the places of vulnerability wherein lies the true gift - our disowned aspects of self …

acceptance and the kind of mirroring that allowed a strong sense of self to be internalized …

Authentic confidence will develop over time from learning how to be present and loving with the insecure part of yourself …

Healthy anger sets boundaries, communicates violations, expresses moral outrage. Healthy anger can be channeled into hard work, creativity, passionate engagement. Healthy anger can create real intimacy - because it is honest and direct.

Toxic anger is usually tied to some kind of repressive cycle such that it builds up and needs to be discharged either by out of proportion reactivity or passive aggression.

Healthy anger is a function of ego-strength.
Toxic anger is usually part of an ego-defense.

As we engage in practices that allow development and healing to occur, INSIGHT arises.
INSIGHT  IS distinct from belief in one simple way: belief is an outside-in phenomenon.
INSIGHT  IS as the word suggests an inside-out phenomenon.

--Michael



The part where Michael talks about a " strong sense of self "... this is
something that I'm learning about--that there is a strong sense of self
that is not really an ego experience, but it is different--like a very
grounded, very effortless experience of BEING. Ah! Yes! Delightful!

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Michael : catalyst-producer

over 2 years later
Michael said


Thanx for sending your kind thoughts and gracious words of support

during our time @ zaadz/gaia.


I have been transferring the entirety of my cyberspace precence, comments,
hyper-links and most important other stuff, initially to an invite-only private space,
whilst I get my re-connecting-connections-act back together, so to speak.

The place I've set up is …

http://letschangetheworld.ning.com/

SO IF you send * me your email I can invite you to that space so that you may have direct access, to that space (whilst being aware that all the links don't yet work); and any new links I create to that private space, which will allow you
access from the occasional zBlog that I intend to post in Siona's space


http://anewgaia.ning.com/profile/MichaelGrove


I HOPE that makes sense …


and to quote Vaclav Havel - HOPE IS a dimension of the soul which does
not depend on our analysis of the facts or our assessment of the
situation. IT IS NOT the conviction that things will turn out all right
in the end, BUT the conviction that the struggle has a purpose,
whatever direction events take.

My very kindest regards


michael - * mydothead@hotmail.co.uk
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Leave Your Wise and Insightful Comment

Views: 300

Comment by Michael Grove on March 6, 2012 at 10:56

 

DOES IT REALLY make me HAPPY

   

To LIVE LIFE happily we

must LIVE LIFE UNSEEN

 

Comment by Michael Grove on July 17, 2012 at 22:54

The overlapping domains of science, religion, and philosophy should be regarded as virtual rain forests of cross-pollinating ideas—precious reserves of endlessly fecund memes that are the raw ingredients of consciousness itself in all its diverse manifestations.

The messy science/religion/philosophy interface should be treasured as an incredibly fruitful cornucopia of creative ideas—a constantly coevolving cultural triple helix of interacting ideas and beliefs that is, by far, the most precious of all the manifold treasures yielded by our history of cultural evolution on Earth.

James Gardner

Comment by Michael Grove on May 29, 2013 at 15:03

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the notion that the evolutionary process is ultimately driven by a spiritual impulse is continuing to gain traction, with a growing number of progressive philosophers, scientists, and mystics exploring its implications.

To many, it is simply a compelling philosophy, uniting the revelations of science and spirituality in a way that no other theory can. But others, like Aurobindo before them, are beginning to reach beyond a theoretical discussion to wonder: What might human life and culture look like if we fully took to heart the reality of this view?

Freed from the mythic dogmatisms of premodern religion, transcending the materialistic biases of modern scientific thought, and liberated from the narcissistic self-absorptions of postmodernity, what kind of new world could human beings aligned with the trajectory of a spiritually evolving cosmos actually create?

Comment by Michael Grove on September 19, 2013 at 7:34

In transactional analysis terminology we have a nurturing parent self, a critical parent self,

an uncontaminated adult, a contaminated adult, a free child, a wounded child, an adaptive child,

a rebellious child, and so on. To complicate it even more, each of our selves is at various waves

of development and each stage has its own way of praying

Comment by Michael Grove on September 23, 2013 at 19:22

In their new book, Leading from the Emerging Future- from Ego-system to Eco-system Economies,

Otto Scharmer & Katrin Kaufer suggest that addressing today’s global challenges requires

a threefold revolution-

a revolution of economic thought from ego-system awareness to eco-system awareness,

a revolution of relationships among partners and stakeholders from reactive to generative, and an

institutional revolution from hierarchy and organizing around special interest to co-creative

eco-systems and organizing around commons.  Their intention is to contribute to the currently

emerging global transformation and new economy movement by connecting the dots across 

eight acupuncture points. The authors feel these points need to be addressed in order to lead

personal, relational, and institutional transformation to a new economy that creates well-being

and happiness for all. The book also offers a short introduction to Theory U and presencing, 

that is, the art and practice of leading from the emerging future.

Comment by Michael Grove on November 26, 2013 at 8:24

Everything Is Workable: A Zen Approach to Conflict Resolution

Everything Is Workable gives readers the tools they need for dynamic, vital, and effective

relationships, both personal and professional. Diane Musho Hamilton draws on her years of

experience as a professional mediator, ZEN practitioner, and student of Ken Wilber's Integral

Philosophy to present a spiritual approach to conflict resolution, providing teachings along with

practices and exercises that can be applied to any sort of relationship in which conflict is a factor.

Few people would say they like conflict. Most of us try like heck to avoid it. If we take up meditation

practice, we often expect that to make conflict go away. But . . . surprise! It never does. We still

disagree with each other, argue, get hurt, say things we didn't mean to say. It's at the very least

inconvenient. It's often also destructive. We're stuck with conflict as long as we're human beings

with jobs, relationships, or dry cleaning to be picked up.

Meditation practice enables us to touch the inner source of clarity, understanding, compassion,

and peace - yet the equanimity that we cultivate on the cushion does not always translate into

skillfulness in the way we handle conflict in our personal lives. Interpersonal conflict ends up

being the most difficult and painful part of our path. Though meditation is incomparably helpful,

it doesn't make the sticky interpersonal issues go away. Conflict resolution skills are needed. 


Diane Musho Hamilton suggests that we make conflict resolution a valued part of our practice.

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