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compassion, collaboration & cooperation iN transistion

 Before you judge others or claim any ABSOLUTE TRUTH, consider

 that you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear

 less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are traveling

 at 220 kilometres per second across the galaxy. 90% of the cells in your

 body carry their own microbial DNA and are not "YOU".

The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and

none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in

the belly of a star. Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the

common potato. The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical

photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does

not exist. So you don't just look at a rainbow, you create it. This is pretty

amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colours you see

represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum.

OUR DISCOVERY of the parallel worlds of other animals that inhabit the

self-same planetary environment as ourselves - is "OPENING our EYES"

through a process of enhanced understanding, to reveal and explain to us,

hitherto hidden parallel realities, using new slow-motion, 1000 frames per

second, video camera technology and science to explore the behaviour of

birdsbees, fish and Shaolin monks.

A fascination discussion takes place during the slow motion video of a golden eagle in

flight - birds hyperlink above - in regard to the use of wing feathers (remiges|oarsmen)

for fine control of the birds movement and the use of tail feathers (retrices|helmsmen)

for fine control of the birds direction and speed - a fact that has been obviously well

understood for millennia but 'an art of flying ' that can now be studied in intricate detail,

with the aid of in depth analysis of slow motion footage, for the across-the-board

purposes of the advanced design of 'robot' UAVs.

I suppose my fascination with the knowledge of understanding that can

be gained by virtue of the explicit study of slow motion video footage,

began during my association with Oxford Scientific Films, as a result of

my involvement with the BBC Computer Literacy Project.


I was a consultant 
to Acorn Computers at the time, whilst still employed by

the Civil Aviation Authority and involved in the development of the first

publicly demonstrable PAL Interactive Videodisc Authoring System.

remember vividly, the Christmas in Tackley, studying the footage of a

Barn Owl swooping down on its prey and the writing of three quite complex

BBC Basic computer programmes, to drive the system - whilst explaining,

by way of still-frame and stop motion sequences, the different processes

by which the Barn Owl, hovered, stalled its wings and then pounced on its

prey, with its wings outstretched above its body to minimise wind 

resistance, whilst maximising the rate at which the Barn Owl literally falls

out of the sky, with open claws ready to arrest its prey.


The active play videodisc that I used was the original non-teletext version

of The BBC Videobook of British Garden Birds, which had been recently  

produced by Andy Finney, whilst working for the BBC, and the Barn Owl

footage was no where near as detailed as can be seen in the video piece

above. Nonetheless it was the beginning of my awakening to the fact that

hidden parallel realities existed, here on earth, other than our own

relatively restricted perception of the ONE WORLD that our species and ALL

other LIFE inhabits. It had been Linnie's idea that I utilise the 'Owl' footage

rather than that of the bigger section on 'Pigeons', because of its additional

interest and the fact, no doubt, that the 'OWL' had indeed been selected as

the logo of the BBC Computer Literacy Project.



Much of what we can barely comprehend in realtime is revealed in slow motion. Beyond our everyday lives and perceptions of the world there is a parallel universe of incredible beauty and astonishing facts. Seeing it through the lens of a high speed camera allows us to begin to understand how the world works.


NB - Time-lapse photography can be considered the very opposite of 

high speed photography or slow motion. It was Oxford Scientific Films

who were the first ever to use this technique to film the "crown effect"

splash of a drop of water falling into a pool of water. In contrast it is  

Time-lapse photography which is utilised to record the gradual

movement of activity, in a particular transition of events, to show, in a 

much shorter time, the construction of a skyscraper, for example. It is a 

technique whereby the frequency at which film frames are captured (the

frame rate) is much lower than that used to view the sequence. When

played at normal speed, time appears to be moving faster and thus lapsing.

For example, an image of a scene may be captured once every second,

then played back at 30 frames per second; the result is an apparent

30 × (24 [cinema] / 25 [PAL] / 30 [NTSC] frames per second) times speed

increase. 

Views: 174

Comment by Michael Grove on July 18, 2014 at 11:19

Using incredible high speed camera work the team reveal how

a Goshawk attacks it's prey during mid flight.

Comment by Michael Grove on February 27, 2016 at 7:51

Which leads me onwards to where I started with Acorn, the BBC and the Council for Educational Technology ...

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=863908156970770


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