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    a neutral measure of Natural Time to

    securing net neutrality with our version

    of actionable intelligence?

The Law of Time is a universal law and principle. It

states that time is the universal factor of synchronization.

The Law of Time distinguishes between a natural timing frequency that governs the universal order, and an artificial timing frequency which sets modern human civilization apart from the rest of its environment, the biosphere.              

The Law of Time affirms that all of the planetary upheavals and social chaos that we are experiencing today are directly related to giving precedence to human laws and machine technology, rather than divine order and natural law. This is due to living a collective misperception of time known as the 12:60 frequency. This refers to the 12 month cycle of the irregular Gregorian calendar paced by the 60 minute clock. 

The Law of Time affirms that by the nature of the universal timing frequency the world is already as one. It is only humankind who has chosen separation. This separation is reinforced by separation in time, living by the clock and the irregular measure of the Gregorian calendar keeps the world from being as one.

The Law of Time states that: Energy factored by time equals ART. In this equation, (E) refers to all phenomena in their processes of unfoldment; (T) is the present moment functioning according to the ratio constant 13:20.

EVERYTHING SHAPED BY TIME IS ART and

THROUGH ART ALL THINGS  PROBABLE

  
     

  … because THE EFFECT of basing a civilization on artificial timing factors
  - an irregular calendar and the mechanical clock - has resulted in the
  creation of an artificial global mantle, the technosphere. By consuming
  natural resources faster than they can be replaced and creating more waste 
  than can be eliminated, the technosphere operates at the expense of the
  biosphere. Hence, the current global crisis. The 13:20 ratio of the natural
  timing frequency  coded into the Tzolkin – the 260-unit harmonic matrix.
  The 13:20 frequency can also be found in our body: we have 13 main

Gerrit Rietveld belonged to the De Stijl movement between 1919 and 1931.

The chief spokesman for this group of artists was the painter Piet Mondrian,

who described their theories as an attempt to close the gap between

ART and LIFE. Their essential principle was that there should be purity of

all elements; purity of unimpeded horizontals and verticals, and primary

colours with black, white and grey. The paintings of Mondrian’s mature

style which have so many similarities to the Red-Blue chair began to emerge

about two years after the chair was designed, implying an exchange of

influence and ideas. In spite of Rietveld’s far-sighted IDEAS about the

simplification and cost reduction of furniture making, the Red-Blue chair

appears to be made solely according to aesthetic criteria, almost a sculpture

or an architectural exercise: the functional aspect appears incidental.

Rietveld himself is said to have complained of bruising his ankles on it, and

a certain daring seems required actually to use the chair.

The construction [IT]self IS very direct, and well adapted to mass

production. [IT]’s dimensions are all based on a ten-centimetre module,

so that the chair can be made without using complex working drawings.

The colouring is also completely straightforward. The Black-stained bars

have bright yellow ends, which, as they are square or squatly rectangular,

read as small planes. Against the dark floor, the chair would be seen as

two large primary coloured planes surrounded by a multiplicity of small

ones shimmering in space.



Clement Meadmore - The Modern ChairChair Classics in production 

Copyright Studio Vista - A Division of Cassell and Collier Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

First Published in Great Britain 1974

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