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compassion, collaboration & cooperation iN transistion

THROUGH [ART] ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE [NOW] ...

That's SPIRALogic !!! 


Physicist Silas Beane stated in his New Scientist article entitled ...

The idea we live in a simulation isn’t science fiction 

"There is a famous argument that we probably do live in a simulation. The idea is that in future, humans will be able to simulate entire universes quite easily. And given the vastness of time ahead, the number of these simulations is likely to be huge. So if you ask the question: ‘do we live in the one true reality or in one of the many simulations?’, the answer, statistically speaking, is that we’re more likely to be living in a simulation."


My own vision, as a child, of an IDEA of a future time when we would be able to personally experience a simulation of the reality, such that we would be unable to tell the difference between the simulation and the reality, was truly demonstrated last evening, in the form of a SIMULATION of an IDEA, whilst watching David Attenborough's epic tale about a Titanosaur’s skeleton which was recovered in Patagonia, following the discover of part of a gigantic thigh bone, which was protruding above the ground, by a farmer tending for his sheep.
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Comment by Michael Grove on September 22, 2021 at 12:30

Never forgetting that [IT] was R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER who wrote the following in his exemplary plan for the future entitled Utopia or Oblivion • Prospects for HUMANITY

 

“To make the world work for 100% of humanity in the shortest possible time through spontaneous cooperation without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone • ALL of humanity now has the option to “make it” successfully and sustainably, by virtue of our having minds, discovering principles and being able to employ these principles to do more with less”

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